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Burlington Arcade in Mayfair

A unique location and the

Benchmark in luxury and craftsmanship

As one of the most refined districts in London, Mayfair is considered to be the epitome of British craftsmanship and bespoke luxury.

Steeped in history and tradition, it is home to London’s largest concentration of 5-star hotels, including The Connaught and The Ritz, the city’s most eminent and discreet private members’ clubs, a wealth of Michelin-starred restaurants and some of the world’s most famous destination shopping addresses, including Bond Street, Savile Row, Burlington Arcade and Fortnum & Mason.

Mayfair’s magnificent Royal Parks and iconic streets connect Buckingham Palace and St James’s to the south, Hyde Park and Knightsbridge to the west, and Piccadilly’s theatre-land to the east.

Buckingham Palace
Wellington Arch, Green Park
The Connaught, Mayfair
Don Scott-Horne, Scott’s, est. 1851

"Flair and culture are embedded in Mayfair. It is the calibre of what is available that makes it unique"

Rupert Sanderson, Shoe Designer based on Bruton Place

  • The Royal Academy of Arts, Piccadilly

    Steeped in History and Tradition

    In 1700, Clarges Street represented the westernmost boundary of London. The area was transformed between the early 17th and mid-18th centuries, the latter period attracting a fashionable clientele to its newly splendid Georgian avenues, parks and squares.

    Clarges Street was named after Sir William Clarges and was built around the year 1717 on the site of a stately building previously in the occupation of the Venetian ambassador.

    Bordered to the south by Piccadilly, one of the most famous streets in the world, many of the gentry’s palaces were located here in the 18th century, with the Royal Academy of Arts the most notable architectural survivor. The Ritz, The Wolseley and Devonshire House all contribute visually to the rich architecture of this fine Conservation Area.

  • Green Park

    Royal Parks and Hidden Garden Treasures

    Clarges Mayfair is positioned opposite one of the most treasured royal Parks – Green Park. With just over 40 acres of mature trees and grassland next to Buckingham Palace, it is the ultimate peaceful triangle between Piccadilly and Constitution Hill.

    To the west of Clarges Mayfair, Royal Hyde Park and Royal Kensington Gardens comprise a combined 625 acres and are home to famous landmarks including the Serpentine lake and the Princess Diana Memorial.

    A somewhat hidden sanctuary among the many parks and gardens in Mayfair, and located just a short walk from Clarges Mayfair, is Mount Street Gardens. Intimately lined with benches, the park features an eclectic range of unusual plants and trees from Australia, The Canary Islands and south-east China.

  • The Arts Club, Mayfair

    The Arts Club

    World-class art in a members-only sanctuary

    Founded by, among others, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope and Lord Leighton in 1863, The Arts Club on Dover Street is seen as the Royal Academy’s unofficial private members club. Celebrating the arts and sciences, it houses a world-class art collection and welcomes a starry selection of patrons including Mark Ronson, Gwyneth Paltrow and Prince Philip. Revamped in 2011 by renowned interior designer David D’Almada, the private members’ club spans across four storeys, with facilities that range from hotel rooms to a Kyoto-inspired restaurant.

  • Smythson store in Mayfair

    Smythson

    Luxury stationery, a neighbourhood tradition

    Writing cards and letters is quintessential to Mayfair etiquette and nothing but the best stationery is used to keep this tradition alive. Founded 125 years ago, Smythson has become world famous for its iconic stationery and diaries presented in Nile Blue boxes. Currently holding all three Royal Warrants, it offers a wide range of exclusive products ranging from leather bound notebooks to handbags. Recently renovated by Waldo Works, the Smythson flagship is lined with the brand’s iconic paper, immersing the customers in a Smythson journey.